Baby Monitors, Lamps And Sound Systems Blamed For Slow Broadband

Written by David Richards     09/11/2015 | 07:47 | Category: INDUSTRY

Do you have slow broadband? Is your Internet service patchy, the problem could be Interference from baby monitors, cordless telephones and electric lamps claim experts?

Baby Monitors, Lamps And Sound Systems Blamed For Slow Broadband
According to the UK organisation OfCom consumers should keep their routers "far away" from certain attached electrical devices that produce wireless signals.

The watchdog's chief executive Sharon White said while many homes did receive fast broadband through their phone lines, the speed of the connection was often hit by "interference" because of where people had installed their router in their home.

"We estimate that consumers' home broadband experience may not be working as well as it could in around a fifth of UK homes," Ms White wrote in The Daily Telegraph.

"This is often caused by something unrelated to the Internet connection, which could be as simple as interference to the broadband router from a lamp, stereo speakers or baby monitor."

In Australia there were approximately 12.8 million internet subscribers in Australia at the end of June 2015, 12.4M households are connected to some form of broadband. 

This is an increase of 2% from the end of June 2014. As at 30 June 2015, almost all (99%) internet connections were broadband.

The average broadband speed is between 10 -12 Mbs Vs 18.7Mbps in the UK - but this only represents the speed at which the broadband enters the home, without any interference.

the experts claim that a Wi-Fi signal is weakened if the box is too near other devices that emit radio waves. 

The list of offending devices includes cordless telephones and electric lamps, which are frequently kept next to routers on coffee tables and sideboards.

Sharon White, chief executive of Ofcom says it is vital that householders set up their Wi-Fi routers to maximise the speed of the broadband that enters their home.

"We estimate that consumers' home broadband experience may not be working as well as it could in around a fifth of homes," Ms White says.
"This is often caused by something unrelated to the Internet connection, which could be as simple as interference to the broadband router from a lamp, stereo speakers or baby monitor."