3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers

X

EXCLUSIVE: A new research study reveals that consumers are, excited about 3D but they are reluctant to replace recently purchased flat panel TV’s. They are also concerned that 3D movies could cause headaches and that 3D glasses will be “a pain” to purchase, use, and share.

Two-thirds (67 percent) of those planning to buy a 3D-enabled TV within the next three years say they will be more likely to buy if they can receive and watch 3D television programs through an antenna, or set top box similar to what Foxtel offers.

Conducted by Zpryme Research & Consulting who recently conducted the Australian appliance market study, the research Company claims that consumers are set to “wait and see” and are hopeful that current HD TV’s that they recently purchased, will be upgradeable in the future.


More than 10,000 consumers were questioned by ZRC.

Most consumers said that that 3DTV will be great for occasional events, like sports and movies but not mainstream TV like soap drama’s and news.


ZRC admits that there is currently a big “3DTV buzz” associated with 3D TV technology and that consumer focus is on topics such as 3D glasses, 3D technology in general, and the specific equipment needed to access a 3D viewing experience.

They said that 3D product-related topics account for more than half (61%) of all 3DTV-related buzz. Discussion about how, when, and why consumers expect to be using 3DTV attracts substantial buzz.

Some consumers are still questioning the relevance of 3DTV and the availability of 3D content in the early day of 3D being launched in Australia while others are questioning whether Sony’s PS3 Playstation which when upgraded to 3D will work on none Sony 3D TV’s.

 73% of all people questioned about 3D were positive about the technology however 69% were negative about the idea of having to wear 3D glasses to watch 3D content.

Consumers complained that 3D glasses will be impractical? and a pain to wear.

They perceive that 3D glasses will be uncomfortable to wear? and won’t feel right?, especially over other glasses, while others complained about having to buy additional glasses for friends who may visit and want to watch 3D TV.

Some consumers said that they were worried that prolonged 3D viewing will cause eye-straining? and migraine headaches.

With several consumers cost is still an issue and several worry that they will have to throw out? their new HDTVs in order view 3D content.

They complained about having to buy additional equipment, such as HDMI 1.4 compatible receivers and 3D glasses in addition to new TVs.

A large majority 89% said that they expect 3D features to become standard? or free and that they are prepared to wait for the technology to develop.

 

They say that 3D will be just another feature on high-end TV’s and they expect it to become an “unavoidable”, “standard feature like Wi-Fi.

Many consumers remain unconvinced, they feel that 3DTV is a gimmick and a fad that the technology will come and go. They say they are waiting for 3D to be the norm.

SmartHouse Research reveals that 89% of consumers are intrigued by 3D TV and will visit a retail store to have a look. 96% said that they doubted whether they will buy a 3D TV yet. The most common complaint was that the technology is not mature and that content is limited.

 Movies and sport were perceived as the two biggest drawcards to the technology. Some consumer’s said that 3D Technology made movies look “fake and not real”.

 Increased availability of 3D content is vitally important to sales of 3D-enabled TVs in 2010 and beyond.

According to consumer research from the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) and the Entertainment and Technology Center (ETC) at the University of Southern California, content remains the key component in future adoption of 3D in the home.

 

Two-thirds (67 percent) of those planning to buy a 3D-enabled TV within the next three years say they will be more likely to buy if they can receive and watch 3D television programs through an antenna, cable, satellite or fiber-to-the-home. 

Most say the primary reason to buy a 3D-enabled set is to watch 3D movies at home; 65 percent want to watch movies, 36 percent want to play 3D video games and 33 percent want to watch television programming.

“2010 will be an important year for 3D in the home, with 3D-enabled sets on store shelves today and content continuing to evolve and expand,” said Shawn DuBravac, CEA’s chief economist and research director. “3D content in the home shows potential as 3D-specific cable channels continue to be announced and more movies and sporting events are slated to be transmitted in 3D in the coming months.”

audiopro 728x90 2 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
Versa3 Leaderboard 728x90 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
4Squre Ads 07 728x90 1 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
DCS 8300LHV2 728x90 smarthouse 1 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
%name 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
2231 NEXUS 4SQM Digital Banner Ads Leaderboard 728x90 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
PAN1992 MWO Banners LB 728x90px V2 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
Banner Shyla 728x90 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
728x90 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers
ARL0355 Arlo ESS Indoor Generic Banner 728x90 V4 scaled 3DTV: Headaches, 3D Glasses And Sony PS3 Create Concern For Consumers


YOU MAY ALSO LIKE